Balkans | Kosovar Prime Minister Kurti met representatives of Albanians and Bosniaks in Serbia

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Balkans |  Kosovar Prime Minister Kurti met representatives of Albanians and Bosniaks in Serbia

Kosovar Prime Minister Albin Kurti met with political representatives of the Bosnian and Albanian communities residing in Serbia.

In the statement made by the Cabinet Office, Prime Minister Kurti held a meeting with Suleiman Ojljanin, Chairman of the Sandzak Democratic Action Party (SDA Sancak) in Serbia, Bosnian deputies in the Serbian National Assembly, Selma Kočević, Ence Imamović, and the only one. The Albanian MP, Šep Kamberi, specified in the Prime Minister’s Office in the capital, Pristina.

During the meeting, the proposal of the European Union (EU) to normalize relations between Kosovo and Serbia (the Franco-German plan) was discussed, in the statement referred to, “The rights of non-majority communities in our country reflect our development as a society and our level of democracy. Communities must be treated without discrimination on the basis of principles Universality and full compliance with EU standards. Data included.

In the statement, he stated that the delegation was not satisfied with the general situation of Albanians and Bosniaks living in Serbia and demanded “rights equal to those of Serbs living in Kosovo”.

During the meeting, Prime Minister Kurti, culture, youth and sports He was accompanied by Minister Hajarullah Gekko.

Franco-German plan

The European Union calls on Kosovo and Serbia to reach a final agreement that can solve the issues between the two countries to make progress in the integration process.

Finally, the two parties negotiate the text known as the “Franco-German Plan”, which is supported by all members of the United States of America and the European Union.

According to the plan, which was leaked to the media, Kosovo should allow the creation of a Federation of Serb Municipalities in municipalities in the country where most Serbs live.

Serbia is required to respect Kosovo’s territorial integrity and allow it to join international organizations.

Serbia considers Kosovo, which unilaterally declared its independence in 2008, to be its territory.

Serbia and Kosovo, which clash periodically, are trying to find a common way to normalize relations, and eventually the two countries get to know each other, within the scope of the Belgrade-Pristina dialogue process that began in 2011 with the mediation of the European Union.

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